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How to be prepared for an accident Keep important items in your car’s glove box such as paper and a pencil for taking notes, a card that lists local law enforcement agency contact numbers and your medical allergies or conditions that first responders...
about 4 days ago
Record what happens While you’re on site, write down the location of the accident and how it happened. Take pictures of the damage done to all of the vehicles involved. Ask any witnesses for their contact information in case the drivers disagree about...
about 5 days ago
4. Exchange information with the drivers involved Drivers involved should provide each other with their: •Name •Address •Phone number •Insurance company name •Insurance policy number •Name of the insured person and relationship to the driver ...
about 6 days ago

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Act Now to Become a Partner

No other hazard or behavior comes close to claiming as many teen lives as driving. Approximately 60 teens die each year in car crashes in Virginia.

Involved, informed parents have long been considered the most influential factor in promoting safe teen driving. The mission of Partners for Safe Teen Driving is to help communities develop a parent education program, so that parents can guide their children through the first perilous years of driving.

Many school divisions and communities in Virginia have partnered to develop Safe Teen Driving programs. Approximately 43 communities now require parents of teen drivers to attend a meeting. At this meeting, parents receive information about Virginia's graduated licensing procedures, current driving techniques, procedures for helping teach their children to drive, curfew restrictions, and more.

A kit with step-by-step information about how communities can start their own programs has been sent to every school division in Virginia. CLICK HERE for more information.

For more information about Partners for Safe Teen Driving, call (800) 609-2680.

Move Over Law

Traffic-related incidents continue to be a leading cause of death among on-duty law enforcement officers. Help to protect law enforcement officers and other first responders who are stopped on roadways by obeying Virginia’s Move Over Law.

If you are approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing; blinking; or alternating blue, red, or amber lights stopped on the road, slow down and move over. If you cannot safely change lanes, reduce your speed and proceed with caution.

To learn more about Virginia’s Move Over Law, visit Slow Down Move Over VA Code.

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Statewide holiday safety campaign aims to keep teens safe https://t.co/BbszPDuIPO
about 3 days ago
When the chilly temperatures of winter set in, will your vehicle be ready for the cold? Check out the link below… https://t.co/IuQmM2WnV7
about a week ago
Get a safe ride home from the bar. Otherwise, law enforcement will have to get involved. #ActLikeItVA https://t.co/Gx1DzASyAp
about a week ago

What's New?

Follow Us on Facebook

How to be prepared for an accident Keep important items in your car’s glove box such as paper and a pencil for taking notes, a card that lists local law enforcement agency contact numbers and your medical allergies or conditions that first responders...
about 4 days ago
Record what happens While you’re on site, write down the location of the accident and how it happened. Take pictures of the damage done to all of the vehicles involved. Ask any witnesses for their contact information in case the drivers disagree about...
about 5 days ago
4. Exchange information with the drivers involved Drivers involved should provide each other with their: •Name •Address •Phone number •Insurance company name •Insurance policy number •Name of the insured person and relationship to the driver ...
about 6 days ago

Visit Us on Youtube